June 7, 2011

 

On June 6, 2011 Lisa Jackson, Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), announced that over $76 million of federal grants and loans will be spent on the cleanup of contaminated abandoned property across the United States.  According to the EPA there are an estimated 450,000 abandoned and contaminated waste sites across the country. The federal monies can be leveraged with private monies and state and local government shares to boost redevelopment and promote economic growth.

 

Minnesota’s portion of the grant monies is allocated to site assessment and cleanup as follows:

 

Applicant Name

Type of Grant

Site Name

Approved Total Funding

Chisholm, MN

Assessment

Assessment Coalition

$726,500

Duluth Economic Development Authority, MN

Cleanup

Atlas Industrial Park site

$200,000

Duluth, MN

Assessment

Community-wide Hazardous Substances

$200,000

Ramsey County, MN

Assessment

Community-wide Hazardous Substances

$200,000

Saint Paul, MN

Cleanup

Trillium South Site

$200,000

 

For more detailed information on specific work to be completed at these Minnesota sites, please see the following links to the EPA’s website: http://cfpub.epa.gov/bf_factsheets/index.cfm?grant_type_id=1001,1002,1012&grant_announcement_year=2011.  For each recipient, there is a fact sheet describing how the federal monies will be used.

 

An assessment of a contaminated site is required to determine the extent of contamination that may be present at an abandoned site. Typically, in the assessment phase a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment and other follow up investigations are completed at these sites. This work is designed to determine whether soil, groundwater or vapor impacts are present and the extent of any observed impacts. Once a thorough site assessment is completed, the scope of the pollution can be defined and an appropriate plan for site cleanup can be developed.  Depending on future redevelopment plans for a site, it may be possible to leave some contamination in place.  The potential for vapor intrusion into either existing or planned structures needs to be addressed.  If vapor intrusion is a potential concern, it may be possible to install a vapor barrier or other engineering controls such as an active or passive sub-slab depressurization system to protect building occupants.

 

For more information on EPA’s Fiscal Year 2011 grant recipients by state please visit:http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/pilot_grants.htm.  For information on EPA’s Brownfields program please visit: http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/.

 

At Hessian & McKasy our environmental law attorneys regularly assist clients who are involved with the redevelopment of polluted or contaminated sites. We represent land owners, developers, purchasers and state and local government entities who are involved with the purchase, sale or redevelopment of contaminated property. Our environmental attorneys assist with the drafting of purchase agreements and related documents. We structure transactions to minimize the risks of liability. We work with our clients and environmental consultants to develop plans to investigate sites and, where necessary, to clean up contamination. When possible, we obtain liability assurances from state and federal agencies for our clients.

The views here are my own and do not reflect the views of my employer, Hessian & McKasy, a Professional Association.

To receive www.enviroattorney.net blog updates and posts, please provide your e-mail address in the space at the top of this page.